Soliders Can’t Dance

6 03 2013

Flash – a-ah – saviour of the universe.
Here’s part one of my weekends shootings. More to come soon.

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Click to see larger

This week Soldiers Can’t Dance were treated to the Deadl.ie treatment and were the first in line to scoop up a free shoot. The shoot took place in an abandoned building in the city that was as scary as it was amazing. With thin corrugated iron crumbling beneath our feet, pigeons taking flight and shaking the walls in the process, not to mention the eerie discarded children’s toys littered about the place, the building is one that after this weekend, I’ve probably seen enough of.

The band arrived as I’d hoped. Stylish, on time and up for a good explore of the place. The building was huge so after a good 30 minute search of the place, we’d found our locations. First up the ‘X’ wall (picture 1). A flat wall, with one light pointing at it, with a smoke bomb between the guys and myself and a light above the smoke and the band was how the shot was set up.

As I couldn’t have the light directly above me – given I was shooting quite zoomed in, and the assistant would’ve been visible in the shot, I had the light come from the left. This gives a small fall-off in the light come the right side of the image, but nothing I don’t find acceptable.

The second shot was in the main body of the building. It was full of thick, thick dust, pigeon shit and oddly, rolls of film. There was a large walkway that led down the building about 9 feet above the ground. I raced down this and placed a light at the first crossing of walkways,  point back directly towards the camera and a smokebomb in between the two. The flash behind the smoke was set to full power to really blow out the background, and as the light was slightly tipped up, it also gave a slight fill to the dungeon-like background.

The smoke bombs run for above 30 seconds outdoors normally. Given the dark conditions in ‘the cave’ and the lack of wind, they ran about twice as long. Even after this, they hung around in some sense for a while. Initially they looked too thick, but after a few moments it became manageable. Unfortunately – I missed a few ideal conditions of the smoke given my flash recycling time, but overall I’m happy.

This time I was closer to the band, shooting wide, so I could have my assistant behind me lighting the scene evenly. You can really see the difference. It’s much more even and it’s my personal favourite of the shoot.

I deliberately left Luke (in the orange shirt) to either side of the shot. The guys were all wearing dark colours initially (Luke had a leather jacktet) but I needed to make them stand out slightly. We ditched the jacket and I felt it too obvious to put the only guy in black in the middle.

So there y’are now. Any questions, just ask. I’d be more than happy to help.

Big thanks to Aaron Corr and Aisling Finn for assisting on the shoot!

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Tuner Photoshoot

10 07 2011

This is Tuner, a great band, being blasted with lights from all angles. After a quick edit of the 4gbs of photos from today, here’s a few early highlights. More to come soon!

Anyway, we started off at the back of their own studio (thems the wooden background images) – and moved towards St. Annes Park (surely the best place for photoshoots in Dublin.) Two flashes were used for all the pictures- an SB-600 and the impressive Metz-50. They’re relatively cheap and amazingly easy to use with radio triggers and deliver great results every time. I never thought I understood flashes completely, but after today I reckon I’ve got it down.

Anyway, if you like what you see and would like some pictures like this of your own, gimme a shot. Contact details are, handily, under the ‘contact’ tab at the top of the page!

 

 

 

 

 

 





Thesis : Behind the Irish Music Scene

24 03 2011

So here we are: The first samples of my thesis to date (Except in black and white). The Coloured versions will appear in a book, which I’ll hopefully put up here as a pdf after May.

I’ve basically followed bands around, arriving when they do (usually at 4pm) and going home after they do. I’ve hassled a lot of people, pointed cameras where I was told not to and woken up a disgruntled bass-player with an over enthusiastic flash (not recommended). I’ve shot the bands live, but for the book, only candid, behind the scene images will be used.

 

Let me know what you think!

 

 

 

 

 

 





Duke Special, Tripod, 11th June 2010

12 06 2010

The less said about this the better, but in brief summary :

  • All seated gig, but with no photo-pit – therefore in people’s way taking photographs. Not to mention how close the front tables were to the stage – about a foot between me and the table.
  • Came on stage late – about 40 minutes late, despite being told 8:30 sharp. The show was supposed to be backdropped by a screen showing silent movies – it didn’t work. And was unfixable.
  • Had to argue with security that I was in fact on the list. Thanks to the auld ipod, I could show the confirmation e-mail – and even then I was told to hang on.
  • Etc., etc…

It was a big pity, because I’d seen Band Of Horses in the same venue earlier in the week and it was excellently put together. Really impressed me – made me question my favourite venues (it’s still the Olympia, though), but this was a disaster for so many reasons.

Aaanyway,  y’know the deal by now, click to see larger.